Archetypal Psychology

During the 1970‘s, James Hillman, Pat Berry, Thomas Moore and others developed some of Jung’s central ideas about images, imagination and the soul or psyche, adding elements from Neoplatonic and Renaissance philosophy and aesthetics, Romantic poetry, and Islamic mysticism. They came up with what Hillman called “an imaginal method”, which is what I try to practice. Archetypal psychology is not an ego psychology; the ego is relativized, pathology is understood as an innate aspect of the soul, and beauty and aesthetics are given a central place.

During the 1970‘s, James Hillman, Pat Berry, Thomas Moore and others developed some of Jung’s central ideas about images, imagination and the soul or psyche, adding elements from Neoplatonic and Renaissance philosophy and aesthetics, Romantic poetry, and Islamic mysticism. They came up with what Hillman called “an imaginal method”, which is what I try to practice. Archetypal psychology is not an ego psychology; the ego is relativized, pathology is understood as an innate aspect of the soul, and beauty and aesthetics are given a central place.

Archetypal Psychology